Seasons of fitness

Happy Thursday,

This week I had the privilege of meeting with a chiropractor friend and a massage therapist.
We were discussing the clients we see and the types of fitness programs available these days…
There are a lot. Things come and they go. Some fads are great and some are really harmful. 

The three of us acknowledged that there are seasons of fitness (whether we want them to be or not)…
As we age, we need to consider the longevity of what we are doing.

What you and I were able to do in our teens and our twenties required less recovery time
and was substantially more aggressive than what we can get away with now: high impact, strain on tendons, ligaments and joints etc. 

But at what point do we (re)evaluate what we are doing and change course? 

We need to always be navigating and walking the line between honoring our bodies and
challenging them/ having fun/ pursuing new things. 

Here at Fit Body, we seem to be in an ongoing battle with the philosophy of “more is better”
“no pain no gain”,  “if I am not extremely sore it didn’t work”, “I need to have my a** kicked to see results”.
Thankfully these things are not the case. The science doesn’t support the above statements.
We don’t need to do more, have our butts kicked or be extremely sore to see results.
But sometimes we want that for different reasons. 

It isn’t up to me, or us, as coaches to tell you what you should want but we will coach you to consider
the science and the long term ramifications of “ass kickings” and other sports/ hobbies/ fitness programs
that trash your joints and put you at risk of repetitive use injuries.  

Why? Because we are wanting as much as possible to have our clients for a long time (if not life) and to consider the BIG picture: sustainable movement.  We need to be able to use our bodies for a long, healthy, happy life.
Not just short term asthetics. 

For example, I don’t practice Muy Thai (anymore) because I got tired of being beat up (literally) and the fed up with the strain I was putting on my body.
I do play tennis…I hope to/ plan to play for the rest of my life.
I wanted something competitive. I wanted an occasional adrenaline rush but I needed to consider the long term impact on my body and tennis was much more sustainable

​Consider what sustainability means to you.
Consider modifying what you do/love to continue doing that thing you love for years to come.

Your body will lead the way.

– Megan K

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